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Information and advice

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Coronavirus (COVID-19) - Info for Parents

We have put together some advice and information for Parents and Carers in relation to the Coronavirus.

Education, Health and Care Assessment

The assessment of a child’s Education, Health and Care needs is a coordinated assessment that brings together all existing relevant information about a child. A ‘Keyworker’ from the SEN Team will be assigned to the family to support them through the assessment. The assessment process…

Funding for children with SEND

Funding for Islington Mainstream Schools Funding for all schools includes money that they should use to support children with additional needs Funding for SEND Pupils Funding for children and young people comes under three main headings (or 'elements')

How is my child with SEND supported in school?

Around 5,000 children and young people in Islington have identified Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and most of these are supported in their local mainstream school or Early Years setting. The majority of children and young people will have their needs met through additional…

How your child with autistic spectrum condition is supported in school

Children and young people with autistic spectrum condition have different types and degrees of need that require different levels of support. If your child has an autistic spectrum condition, they may have problems with some or all of the following: Communicating with teachers, support staff…

How your child with emerging needs is supported through early years

All early years settings must to put in place a ‘graduated approach’ to supporting children’s learning development. This is a system to identify and meet the needs of all children, including those who may have special educational needs or disabilities (SEND). Settings include all private…

How your child with general learning difficulties is supported in school

There are different types and degrees of learning difficulty that require different levels of support. If your child has learning difficulties, they may have problems with some or all of the following: Memory Learning how to speak Understanding others Reading and writing Maths skills Putting…

How your child with hearing impairment is supported in school

There are different types and degrees of hearing loss that require different levels of support. A hearing impairment is likely to have an impact on your child’s speech and language development, literacy skills, social communication and emotional development. When babies are born they are assessed…

How your child with physical difficulties is supported in school

There are different types and degrees of physical difficulty that require different levels of support, but pupils with physical difficulties learn well in mainstream schools if attention is paid to their specific needs. If your child has a physical difficulty, they may also have learning…

How your child with social, emotional and mental health needs is supported in school

There are different types and degrees of social, emotional and mental health needs that require different levels of support. If your child has social, emotional or mental health needs they may have problems with some or all of the following: Being unhappy, with low self-esteem…

How your child with speech and language difficulties is supported in school

There are a wide range of impairments covered by the term speech and language difficulties, including the following: Expressive language – for example your child’s ability to speak in sentences Language comprehension – your child’s ability to understand what people say Social communication – your…

How your child with visual impairment is supported in school

There are different types and degrees of visual impairments that require different levels of support. A visual impairment is likely to affect how your child makes sense of the world around them and how they move within it. Visual impairment is often identified early through…

I'm worried my child has SEN

It is important to identify children who do have special educational needs (SEN) as early as possible. This ensures they get the help they need to learn and develop to the best of their ability. If your child has SEN, they may need extra help…

Measuring progress for children with SEND

The progress of all groups of children has been a prominent issue for all schools since the introduction of the 2012 Ofsted inspection framework. Parents also want to see evidence of progress. The issue of showing progress is particularly challenging for children with special educational…

Measuring Success

All children progress at different rates, and the same is true for children with SEND. Children and their needs are individual, and what is appropriate progress is therefore also individual, and has to be defined by success in meeting appropriately challenging SMART goals. The Council…

Person Centred Planning

Person Centred Planning discovers and acts on what is important to a person. It is a process for continual listening and learning, focussing on what is important to someone now and in the future, and acting on this in alliance with their family and their…

Review of Education, Health and Care Plans

Schools and settings are required to meet with parents at least three times a year when their child is receiving SEND support and are responsible for setting up these meetings.

Role and Responsibilities of all Teachers

The Council recognises has an expectation of participation, fulfilment and success for all our children. Planning for progression and differentiation are fundamental to successful teaching and learning. High expectations of progress must apply to all children working above, at, or below age-related expectations, including those who have SEND.…

The Role of a Special Educational Needs Coordinator (SENCo)

All mainstream schools must ensure they have a qualified teacher designated as SEN Coordinator (SENCo). Where they have not been a SENCo at that, or any other school for more than 12 months, they must achieve a National Award in Special Educational Needs Coordination within…

School Attendance and SEND

Despite progress in recent years, both primary and secondary phases in Islington currently perform poorly in terms of school attendance in comparison with statistical neighbours. Children with SEND have higher patterns of non‐attendance; our aim is at least 96% attendance for all children. In 2016‐17,…