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Assess, Plan, Do, Review

The SEND Code of practice is specific about good practice once a potential SEND is identified, and the four types of action needed to put effective support in place through the 'graduated approach'. The four actions are: Assess: the Early Years / class teacher and SENCo should…

Children with Complex Needs

When a child has exceptional need for education, health and social care support that cannot be met from resources, assessments or interventions normally available on their education setting, they will need an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP). Where a child’s health or care needs…

Coronavirus (COVID-19) - Info for Parents

We have put together some advice and information for Parents and Carers in relation to the Coronavirus.

Education, Health and Care Assessment

The assessment of a child’s Education, Health and Care needs is a coordinated assessment that brings together all existing relevant information about a child. A ‘Keyworker’ from the SEN Team will be assigned to the family to support them through the assessment. The assessment process…

Expectations of all mainstream schools: what should be in place

Provision for children with SEND is a matter for the whole school. The way in which this responsibility is excercised by individual staff is therefore a matter for each school, taking into account size, priorities, ethos etc. However, the Council expects all schools, as a minimum,…

Funding for children with SEND

Funding for Islington Mainstream Schools Funding for all schools includes money that they should use to support children with additional needs Funding for SEND Pupils Funding for children and young people comes under three main headings (or 'elements')

How is my child with SEND supported in school?

Around 5,000 children and young people in Islington have identified Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and most of these are supported in their local mainstream school or Early Years setting. The majority of children and young people will have their needs met through additional…

How your child with autistic spectrum condition is supported in school

Children and young people with autistic spectrum condition have different types and degrees of need that require different levels of support. If your child has an autistic spectrum condition, they may have problems with some or all of the following: Communicating with teachers, support staff…

How your child with emerging needs is supported through early years

All early years settings must to put in place a ‘graduated approach’ to supporting children’s learning development. This is a system to identify and meet the needs of all children, including those who may have special educational needs or disabilities (SEND). Settings include all private…

How your child with general learning difficulties is supported in school

There are different types and degrees of learning difficulty that require different levels of support. If your child has learning difficulties, they may have problems with some or all of the following: Memory Learning how to speak Understanding others Reading and writing Maths skills Putting…

How your child with hearing impairment is supported in school

There are different types and degrees of hearing loss that require different levels of support. A hearing impairment is likely to have an impact on your child’s speech and language development, literacy skills, social communication and emotional development. When babies are born they are assessed…

How your child with physical difficulties is supported in school

There are different types and degrees of physical difficulty that require different levels of support, but pupils with physical difficulties learn well in mainstream schools if attention is paid to their specific needs. If your child has a physical difficulty, they may also have learning…

How your child with social, emotional and mental health needs is supported in school

There are different types and degrees of social, emotional and mental health needs that require different levels of support. If your child has social, emotional or mental health needs they may have problems with some or all of the following: Being unhappy, with low self-esteem…

How your child with speech and language difficulties is supported in school

There are a wide range of impairments covered by the term speech and language difficulties, including the following: Expressive language – for example your child’s ability to speak in sentences Language comprehension – your child’s ability to understand what people say Social communication – your…

How your child with visual impairment is supported in school

There are different types and degrees of visual impairments that require different levels of support. A visual impairment is likely to affect how your child makes sense of the world around them and how they move within it. Visual impairment is often identified early through…

I'm worried my child has SEN

It is important to identify children who do have special educational needs (SEN) as early as possible. This ensures they get the help they need to learn and develop to the best of their ability. If your child has SEN, they may need extra help…

Measuring progress for children with SEND

The progress of all groups of children has been a prominent issue for all schools since the introduction of the 2012 Ofsted inspection framework. Parents also want to see evidence of progress. The issue of showing progress is particularly challenging for children with special educational…

Measuring Success

All children progress at different rates, and the same is true for children with SEND. Children and their needs are individual, and what is appropriate progress is therefore also individual, and has to be defined by success in meeting appropriately challenging SMART goals. The Council…

Moving in and out of Islington - Children with Education, Health and Care Plans

Moving to Islington If a young person has an Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan, and their family are moving into Islington, it is helpful for parents and carers to contact the Special Education Team as early as possible. The Team can then advise them…

Notional SEN Budgets for Islington School 2018-19

What is the 'Notional SEN Budget and how is it calculated? LAs must, through the Schools Forum, identify the formula by which schools receive funding to provide support for pupils with SEND. This is called a 'Notional SEN Budget'. It is called 'notional' because no-one…

Person Centred Planning

Person Centred Planning discovers and acts on what is important to a person. It is a process for continual listening and learning, focussing on what is important to someone now and in the future, and acting on this in alliance with their family and their…

Preparing for adulthood EHC Plan reviews

All EHC Reviews taking place from Year 9 and onwards must include a focus on preparing for adulthood, including employment, independent living and participation in society. This transition planning must be built into the EHC plan and where relevant should include effective planning for young…

Review of Education, Health and Care Plans

Schools and settings are required to meet with parents at least three times a year when their child is receiving SEND support and are responsible for setting up these meetings.

Role and Responsibilities of all Teachers

The Council recognises has an expectation of participation, fulfilment and success for all our children. Planning for progression and differentiation are fundamental to successful teaching and learning. High expectations of progress must apply to all children working above, at, or below age-related expectations, including those who have SEND.…

The Role of a Special Educational Needs Coordinator (SENCo)

All mainstream schools must ensure they have a qualified teacher designated as SEN Coordinator (SENCo). Where they have not been a SENCo at that, or any other school for more than 12 months, they must achieve a National Award in Special Educational Needs Coordination within…

The Role of Governors

Duties of Governing Bodies for SEN Governing Bodies have statutory responsibilities for pupils with SEND – they are set out in primary and secondary legislation The governing body must do its best to ensure that the school makes the necessary provision for every pupil with SEND…

The Role Teaching Assistants (TAs)

'Deployment and Impact of Support Staff' by the Institute of Education (2009) reported on a five year study of 8,200 children.  The study found that children who received the most support from TAs consistently made less progress than similar children who received less TA support.  'There has been…

School Attendance and SEND

Despite progress in recent years, both primary and secondary phases in Islington currently perform poorly in terms of school attendance in comparison with statistical neighbours. Children with SEND have higher patterns of non‐attendance; our aim is at least 96% attendance for all children. In 2016‐17,…

School SEND Information Report

The SEN Code of Practice says that Governing Bodies must publish information on their websites about the implementation of their SEND policy. The information published must be updated annually, with any in-year changes updated as soon as possible.

Secondary Transfer for Children with SEND

The aim of this information is to help parents of children with Education Health and Care (EHC) Plans who are coming up to secondary transfer. This is because secondary transfer arrangements work in a slightly different way for your child.

SEN Support in Islington - Behaviour Handbook

The Behaviour Handbook for Islington schools outlines approaches and interventions which encourage and allow inclusion and reduce the risk of exclusion. Within the universal offer, which underpins the layers of support and intervention, is an understanding and ethos which supports the ideals of inclusion. It…

Special School Admission Information

Most children and young people with SEN are educated in mainstream schools. Each mainstream school in Islington is supported by the Outreach teams linked to the local special schools. Their role is to build the skills, knowledge and capacity of mainstream schools to make sure…

Supporting Children with SEN in Schools

Children usually start school in the September after their 4th birthday, and will stay in education until they are at least 18 years old. Throughout their school years teachers will plan their lessons to make sure that all children can learn at their own pace.…

Supporting children with SEN to maintain a healthy weight

'Health risks and the threat of obesity are huge concerns for families of children with disabilities and special needs. The issue goes beyond food and portion control for these families. It’s a balancing act: working with behaviors and aversions, medications and mobility challenges while exploring…

Supporting pupils with medical conditions

The Children and Families Act 2014 (Section 100) placed a new statutory requirement on schools to make arrangements for supporting children with medical conditions, supported by related guidance Supporting Pupils at School with Medical Conditions.  

Team Around the Child

A Team Around the Child (TAC) is a multi-disciplinary team of practitioners established on a case-by-case basis to support a child, young person or family. TACs support good professional practice in joined-up working, information sharing and early intervention. The model involves: A joined-up assessment, usually…

Thinking about school

Young children develop and change very quickly. Many children who have additional needs in the early years will make good progress and will not need more support when they start primary school. Some with additional needs may need further support when they start school.  Schools…

What are Special Educational Needs?

From the moment they are born children are developing and learning new skills. They do so at different speeds, and learn in different ways. Some may be slow starters but will usually catch up with other children. Children have ‘Special Educational Needs’ (SEN) if they…

Who is eligible for an Education, Health and Care Assessment?

Statutory Assessment for an Education, Health and Care Plan is intended only for those children and young people with the most severe and complex SEND This is defined locally as a child or young person whose needs cannot be met from the resources normally available…